Cash-strapped Brits advised to tackle pressures head on

Tuesday, 27 September 2011 10:55 AM

Stressed out Brits are being advised not to bury their heads in the sand over rising household bills.

A new survey by MoneySupermarket.com has uncovered what it has dubbed a new ‘bill phobia’ plaguing a quarter of cash-strapped UK households.

It claims some 13 million adults now get stressed before even opening their bills as continuous rises leave them unsure of what they might find.

A fifth even admitted to delaying the opening and paying of bills because they are too afraid to tackle them.

However, experts at the price comparison site are advising people to tackle the pressures head on.

Clare Francis, Personal Finance Expert at MoneySupermarket.com, said: “The worst thing people can do is bury their heads in the sand. There are very real practical steps that can be taken to lower the cost of bills, so the dreaded envelope that arrives each month doesn't have to be such a nightmare.”

Consumers are advised to shop around for the best products and tariffs to ensure they are getting the best deal for things like utilities and insurance. Switching to monthly direct debit can also help budget more effectively.
 

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